Events

 

Mar 27
Visual Clave: The Expression of the Latino/a Experience through Album Cover Art: 1940-9011:00 a.m.

Visual Clave explores the evolution of Latin album cover art with particular focus on the United States market. It pays critical attention to issues of identity and...
February 2–April 21
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Visual Clave explores the evolution of Latin album cover art with particular focus on the United States market. It pays critical attention to issues of identity and aesthetics through depictions of Latino/a people and cultures, historical context, and the unsung graphic artists who helped present Latin music—and its attendant socio-cultural themes—to the world. The show weaves a compelling narrative through the display of album jackets for 78 RPM records from the 1930s and ’40s to LP covers from the 1960s through the ’90s. Throughout the exhibition, individual album covers are juxtaposed with their original art, often made by New York-born and based designers from the “golden age of salsa” (late 1960s-’70s). For the artists, record albums served as an important creative outlet for commentary on urgent cultural, political, and economic issues affecting Latin American and Caribbean immigrant communities in the United States. Clave (pronounced CLAH-vay) is the African-derived 2-3 or 3-2 beat used in genres from the Cuban son, mambo, cha-cha-cha and rumba to the Colombian cumbia, the Dominican merengue, and the Mexican son jarocho. Here, the concept of clave—essential to understanding Afro-Antillean popular music and dance—suggests that the visual presentation of the music is as culturally informed as the recordings contained within the packaging. A music listening station will accompany the objects on view.

Visual Clave is organized by Philip W. Scher, UO Professor of Anthropology and Folklore and Public Culture and Divisional Dean for Social, and Pablo E. Yglesias, a Northampton, MA-based Cuban-American researcher, writer, musician, artist, and DJ. An expanded version of the exhibition was on view previously at the Student Union Art Gallery at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst; the Bronx Music Heritage Center, NY; and Picture Farm Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. Visual Clave takes its inspiration and intellectual structure from Yglesias’ book Cocinando: 50 Years of Latin Album Cover Art (Princeton Architectural Press, 2005). The exhibition is supported by UO’s College of Arts and Sciences, the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS), and a JSMA Academic Support Grant.

Apr 10
Cinema & Media Studies in Siena: Info Sessionnoon

On this fall quarter program, you will embark on a ‘voyage’ of discovery through some of the major Italian films. You will learn why Italian films have been so...
April 10 noon–1:00 p.m.
Straub Hall, 254

On this fall quarter program, you will embark on a ‘voyage’ of discovery through some of the major Italian films. You will learn why Italian films have been so influential around the world and why Italy is the country that has won the highest number of Academy Awards. By living in Italy and experiencing its rich culture, you will appreciate why cinema matters so much to the Italian people. Excursions to Rome and Venice will allow you to visit important historic sites and film locations.  Come and learn more about the program from Dr. Sergio Rigoletto, Associate Professor of Italian and Cinema Studies. 

Program Dates:

September 19 - December 7

Application Deadlines:

April 15

Find our more or APPLY TODAY:

https://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/italy/cinema-media-in-siena

Apr 10
Passport to Professionalism: How Your International Experience Can Land You a Job4:00 p.m.

Come learn some valuable skills before the spring Career Fair! That slice of pizza you had in Italy could earn you a job. Well, not directly. However, studying...
April 10 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Peterson Hall, Room 101

Come learn some valuable skills before the spring Career Fair!

That slice of pizza you had in Italy could earn you a job. Well, not directly. However, studying abroad does benefit you professionally. Are you a study abroad alumni interested in learning how to utilize your international experience on your resume and in an interview? If that sounds like you, stop by our 50-minute workshop. GEO has partnered with the Career Center to teach students how to take advantage of these skills to further their career goals. We hope to see you there!

Apr 10
Why are the Migrants Fleeing Honduras? Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup4:00 p.m.

Dana Frank is Professor of History Emerita  at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In this presentation Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long...
April 10 4:00 p.m.–5:30 a.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Dana Frank is Professor of History Emerita  at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In this presentation Dana Frank will discuss her new book, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup, which examines Honduras since the 2009 coup that deposed democratically-elected President Manuel Zelaya. In the book, she interweaves her personal experiences in post-coup Honduras and in the US Congress with a larger analysis of the coup regime and its ongoing repression, Honduran opposition movements, US policy in support of the regime, and Congressional challenges to that policy. Her book helps us understand the root causes of the immigrant caravans of Hondurans leaving for the US, and the destructive impact of US policy.

Apr 11
Curator's Lecture: Visual Clave: The Expression of the Latino/a Experience through Album Cover Art: 1940 - 903:30 p.m.

Co-presented with the CLLAS Spring 2019 Research Presentation Series. 
April 11 3:30 p.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Co-presented with the CLLAS Spring 2019 Research Presentation Series. 

Apr 11
What is Technology? 5:00 p.m.

2019 marks the ten-year anniversary and ninth annual What is...? conference-experience. What is Technology? will examine interactions and transactions among...
April 11–13
White Stag Block

2019 marks the ten-year anniversary and ninth annual What is...? conference-experience.

What is Technology? will examine interactions and transactions among practical arts and tools, techniques and processes, moral knowledge and imagination, to navigate our everchanging world. In a broad sense, technology can be understood as methods of intelligent inquiry and problem-solving in all domains of life. The conference-experience will enact a collaborative network of transdisciplinary research by cultivating information and communication as the heart of science, technology, engineering, art, medicine, and environments.

Plenary Participants: 
• Eric Schatzberg (Georgia Tech)
• Victoria Vesna (UCLA)
• Colin Koopman (Univ. of Oregon)
• Nandini Ranganathan (PNCA)
• Clifford Christians (Univ. of Illinois)
• Carolyn Marvin (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
• Larry Hickman (Southern Illinois Univ. Carbondale)
• Kenji Williams (NASA)
• Charlene Haddock Seigfried (Purdue Univ.)
• Mark Bedau (Reed College)
• Carolyn R. Miller (North Carolina State Univ.)
• Donna Z. Davis (Univ. of Oregon)
• Peter Golding (Univ. of Glasgow, England)
• Lana Rakow (Univ. of North Dakota)
• Melissa Gregg (Intel Corporation)
• Scott Stoud (Univ. of Texas at Austin)
• Amber Case (Institute for the Future)

Early Bird Registration Open!
 

Apr 13
Jerry Chae Clarinet Recital11:30 a.m.

Jerry Chae, Professor of Clarinet, Korean National University of the Arts will perform. This event is part of the Oregon Clarinet Symposium & Young Artist Competition. 
April 13 11:30 a.m.
Beall Concert Hall

Jerry Chae, Professor of Clarinet, Korean National University of the Arts will perform. This event is part of the Oregon Clarinet Symposium & Young Artist Competition. 

Apr 19
Muslims, Christians and Jews in the Music of Medieval Muslim Spain11:30 a.m.

This presentation traces the role of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish musicians and composers in medieval Spain, and beyond. The new song forms and musical styles that emerged in the...
April 19 11:30 a.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

This presentation traces the role of Muslim, Christian, and Jewish musicians and composers in medieval Spain, and beyond. The new song forms and musical styles that emerged in the late 10th century swept across the Arabic-speaking world and Middle East in the Middle Ages, spread northwards into the Christian kingdoms and through Sephardic Jewish communities. Professor Reynolds shows how Andalusian musical forms which persist until the present day have remained in continuous performance for nearly a thousand years. 

Apr 19
Seffarine7:00 p.m.

Seffarine takes its name from the ancient metalworking square in Lamiae’s home city of Fes, Morocco. Her family is well known in the Seffarine as master metalworkers...
April 19 7:00 p.m.
Berwick Hall

Seffarine takes its name from the ancient metalworking square in Lamiae’s home city of Fes, Morocco. Her family is well known in the Seffarine as master metalworkers continuing the tradition today. The square dates back to the 9th century and is famous for the complex rhythms that can be heard from the blacksmiths’ hammers. 

Apr 23
Visions of Impermanence: Prasat Nok Hatsadiling and the Path to Heaven in Northern Thailand4:00 p.m.

Speaker: Rebecca Hall, Assistant Curator, USC Pacific Asia Museum. In Northern Thailand, elaborate cremation structures, called prasat sop, are built to honor high ranking monks....
April 23 4:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Crater Lake North

Speaker: Rebecca Hall, Assistant Curator, USC Pacific Asia Museum. In Northern Thailand, elaborate cremation structures, called prasat sop, are built to honor high ranking monks. These structures are elaborate, beautiful objects created for display during a funeral and then completely destroyed in the cremation fire. The cremation structures give form to Buddhist themes of imperminance while simultaneously treating funeral attendees to a visually splendid treat. A great deal of time and money is often taken to create prasat sop, attesting to their importance for Northern Thai Buddhists. This presentation is an examination of monks’ cremation structures and a discussion of the connection between their form and meaning.