Events

 

Feb 25
5th Annual Eugene Salsa Festival8:00 p.m.

The 5th Annual Eugene Salsa Festival is a weekend of salsa live music, workshops, and performances. On Friday and Saturday night, there will be a one-hour beginning salsa lesson,...
February 23–25
Valley River Inn, McKenzie Ballroom

The 5th Annual Eugene Salsa Festival is a weekend of salsa live music, workshops, and performances. On Friday and Saturday night, there will be a one-hour beginning salsa lesson, an hour of performances by local and world-class groups, and live music and dancing until 2am. Saturday and Sunday will feature a full day of workshops taught by world-renowned instructors as well as an all-day beginners’ bootcamp on Sunday. No previous experience is necessary to attend the festival, and you can come by yourself, with a partner, or with friends.

 

The festival is sponsored by the UO Division of Equity and Inclusion, the UO Department of International Studies, the City of Eugene, the Lane County Cultural Coalition, the Oregon Cultural Trust, and Lane Arts Council. 

Feb 26
Freedom of Speech and Expression Across the “Rural-Urban” Dividenoon

Join UO students, faculty, alums and community members to discuss competing perspectives on freedom of speech and expression across the so-called “rural-urban divide”...
February 26 noon–1:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, Room 141

Join UO students, faculty, alums and community members to discuss competing perspectives on freedom of speech and expression across the so-called “rural-urban divide” in Oregon and the U.S. 

Feb 28
Journalism in London Info Session4:30 p.m.

Immerse yourself in the communications and media scene in London during this five-week summer program. Courses are designed with special emphasis on journalistic skill building as...
February 28 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
McKenzie Hall, 122

Immerse yourself in the communications and media scene in London during this five-week summer program. Courses are designed with special emphasis on journalistic skill building as well as theoretical analytical components. Take two courses covering a variety of topics including a new offering in Summer 2018, Social Media for Journalists, taught by SOJC Professor Damian Radcliffe.

Application Deadline: March 15

Program Dates: June 24-July 28

Find out more: http://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/united-kingdom/journalism-in-london

Mar 1
The Art of Omani Quranic Illumination and Calligraphy4:00 p.m.

This talk will present Oman’s rich legacy of manuscript culture in the broader context of the Muslim world. The presentation will include the recently developed Muscat...
March 1 4:00 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

This talk will present Oman’s rich legacy of manuscript culture in the broader context of the Muslim world. The presentation will include the recently developed Muscat Electronic Mushaf (https://www.mushafmuscat.om/), the first interactive electronic calligraphic Qur’an, the result of a collaboration of scholars from al-Azhar University, and European specialists. The aim of the Muscat Electronic Mushaf is to allow universal access to capture calligraphic traditions of the Arabic script.

Mar 1
Global Perspectives on Freedom of Speech and Expression5:30 p.m.

A panel of UO international students and faculty will discuss global perspectives on freedom of speech and expression.  The panel intends to highlight competing perspectives...
March 1 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, Room 110

A panel of UO international students and faculty will discuss global perspectives on freedom of speech and expression.  The panel intends to highlight competing perspectives and experiences from the panelists’ home countries to Eugene and around the world.  The panel will be moderated by UO International Law Professor Michael Fakhri and will conclude with a Q & A session.  Audience participation is encouraged.

Mar 1
International Musical Film Series6:30 p.m.

Join us Thursday evenings from 6:30-8:00 pm for our winter tour of International Musicals. This free film series is delightfully eclectic and features some very modern and...
January 25–March 15
McKenzie Hall, 175

Join us Thursday evenings from 6:30-8:00 pm for our winter tour of International Musicals. This free film series is delightfully eclectic and features some very modern and culturally different takes on the song and dance of the traditional Hollywood musical.

Week 8, 3/1: Office -China


Following the Lehman Brothers collapse, Miss Chang prepares to list her billion-dollar company on the stock exchange. Before the shares go public, she learns her chairman's promises may not be easy for him to keep.


Week 9, 3/8: Black Cat, White Cat -Yugoslavia


Matko is a small time hustler, living by the river Danube with his 17 year old son Zare. After a failed business deal he owes money to the much more successful gangster Dadan. Dadan has a sister, Afrodita, that he desperately wants to see get married so they strike a deal: Zare is to marry her. But none of the two care much for an arranged marriage: Zare is in love with Ida, Afrodita is waiting for the man of her dreams.


Week 10, 3/15: The Happiness of the Katakuris -Japan


The Katakuris are a family trying to run a peaceful country inn but with a lack of guests there is much excitement for their first visitors, until they wind up dead! As each guest in turn dies in strange circumstances the family agree to hide the bodies, but will the coverups come back to haunt them... ?


 

Mar 8
CLLAS Symposium - Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas9:00 a.m.

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) presents, “Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas.” Our thematic line of...
March 8 9:00 a.m.–7:30 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room - Keynote in Gerlinger Alumni Lounge

The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) presents, “Justice Across Borders: Gender, Race, and Migration in the Americas.” Our thematic line of inquiry this year, America, Bridge Between Oceans, poses the following questions: What happens when we put the Atlantic world in conversation with the Pacific? What kind of art and cultural production emerges? Which stories of struggles for racial, economic, gender and environmental justice arise? How does looking at Latinx and Latin American Studies from within the Pacific Rim region open up innovative and necessary methodological and analytical horizons? These questions also inspire our symposium Justice Across Borders: Race, Gender, and Migration in the Americas.

Fostering conversations about race, ethnicity, diasporas, gender, sexuality, migration, environmental justice, and culture that bridge the Atlantic and Pacific world, the symposium, Justice Across Borders: Race, Gender, and Migration in the Americas, explores what kind of new knowledges, art, social transformations, and activism we can create together in the face of increasing inequalities and social violence across the continent. We meditate on what contributions emerge from Pacific Rim-based research, art, advocacy work, and political movements when we put ourselves in conversation with scholars, artists, and activists based in the Atlantic coast.  We will discuss the increasing visibility of Caribbean migrants in the Pacific Northwest, environmental justice issues in Mexico, the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Southern Cone, archipelagic studies that encompass Caribbean and Pacific islands, gender politics within Latin American and Latinx communities in Oregon, experiences of Latin Americans alongside Pacific Islanders in the Pacific Rim region, queer Latina and AfroLatin@ art, indigeneity, blackness and Jewish diasporas in Latin America, challenges faced by a variety of Latinx communities in the U.S., etc. From a Latinx and Latin American Studies perspective, we engage comparative and relational dialogues with fields such as Pacific Islander Studies, Asian and Asian American Studies, Black Studies, Native American Studies, among others, hoping to bring new light into the epistemic possibilities of our fields and the meaning of Justice for all of us.

Symposium organizer: Alai Reyes-Santos

9:00 – 9:15 AM (Browsing Room)
Welcome from UO administration officials, CLLAS director, symposium coordinator.

9:20-10:30 AM (Browsing Room)
Race, Ethnicity and Diasporas
Rocio ZambranaClaudia HolguínLanie MillarMonique Balbuena, Roberto Arroyo
Chair: Marta Maldonado

10:40-11:50 AM (Browsing Room)
Women and Gender in Latin America and U.S. Latinx communities
Vicky Falcon, Michelle McKinleyKristin YarrisLynn StephenGabriela Martinez
Chair: Vicky Falcon

12:00- 1:00 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
Keynote Speaker/Lunch
“New Directions in Latinx and Latin American Studies: Archipelagos Across the Caribbean and the Pacific”
Guest: Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel
Chair: Rocio Zambrana and Lanie Millar

2:00-3:00 PM (Browsing Room)
Environmental Justice in the Americas 
David Vazquez and Judith Vega, Sarah Wald, Analisa TaylorPedro Garcia-Caro
Chair: David Vazquez

3:10 – 4:30 PM Roundtable (Browsing Room)
“Art, Migration, and Political Activism: Caribbean and Pacific Islander Migrants in the Pacific”
(SPONSORS: Department of Ethnic Studies and Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics)
Panelists:  Judith Sierra-Rivera, JoAnna Poblete, Philipp Carrasco, Ileana Rodriguez Silva, Joyce Pualani Warren
Chair: Alai Reyes-Santos

4:40PM – 5:40 PM  Plenary Session (Browsing Room)
“Latinx Communities: Questions, Challenges, and Transformations”
Monica Rojas, Laura Pulido, Ramona Hernández, Edwin Melendez
Chair: Gerardo Sandoval

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Gerlinger Alumni Lounge)
Riffiando: Dominican Artists in the House! A Talk/Reading/Performance
Josefina Baez, Ana-Maurine Lara, and Ernesto Lara
Coordinator: Ana-Maurine Lara

Light Dinner/Reception

Sponsored by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS); Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics; UO College of Arts and Sciences; The Office of the Provost; Center for the Study of Women in Society; Latin American Studies program; Department of English; Department of Romance Languages; Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Department of Anthropology; Department of Ethnic Studies; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art; School of Journalism and Communications; Department of Philosophy; and the Global Studies Institute.

 

Mar 8
Bike Touring Packing Info Sess...6:00 p.m.

Get ready for Spring Break Bike Touring and learn how to pack for bike touring, and explore some great places to go with you bike on extended journeys! Free! OP Office in...
March 8 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
OP Office in the EMU

Get ready for Spring Break Bike Touring and learn how to pack for bike touring, and explore some great places to go with you bike on extended journeys!

Free!

OP Office in the EMU

6-8pm, Thursday

No registratin required - just show up!

Mar 9
Visiting Guest Lecture | Carsten Strathausen: Neuroaesthetics-The Science of Art?noon

Carsten Strathausen presents Neuroaesthetics—The Science of Art? Over the last two decades, neuroaesthetics--the interpretation of art based on evolutionary theory and...
March 9 noon
Lawrence Hall, Room 115

Carsten Strathausen presents Neuroaesthetics—The Science of Art?

Over the last two decades, neuroaesthetics--the interpretation of art based on evolutionary theory and neuroscientific data--has developed into a prominent new field in the humanities. This lecture provides a critical-historical overview of neuroaesthetics that details both its promise and perils for the study of art and aesthetics.

Carsten Strathausen is Professor of German and English and the Catherine Paine Midldebush Chair in Humanities at the University of Missouri. His first book, The Look of Things. Poetry and Vision Around 1900,was published in 2003 with North Carolina UP. His second book entitled BioAesthetics. Making Sense of Life in Science and the Arts has just come out with Minnesota Press. The author of more than thirty scholarly articles, Strathausen is also the editor of A Leftist Ontology (Minnesota 2009) and the translator of Boris Groys’ book Under Suspicion (Columbia UP 2012).

 

Lecture made possible with support from the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, the Department of Art, the Department of Biology, the Department of Comparative Literature, Department of English, the Department of German & Scandinavian, the Department of Philosophy, the Environmental Studies Program, and the Oregon Humanities Center. 

Mar 13
Robin Wall Kimmerer: "We the People": expanding the circle of citizenship7:30 p.m.

Robin Wall Kimmerer, director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, and professor of Environmental and Forest Biology at SUNY in Syracuse. Her work with the Center...
March 13 7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
Lillis Business Complex, Room 182

Robin Wall Kimmerer, director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, and professor of Environmental and Forest Biology at SUNY in Syracuse. Her work with the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment creates programs which draw on the wisdom of indigenous and scientific knowledge to work toward greater sustainability. In collaboration with tribal partners, she and her students have an active research program in the ecology and restoration of plants of cultural significance to Native people.